Ticketmaster Proxy – Choosing the Best

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Lots of websites hate proxies, many block them but there’s only a few who spend a serious amount of resources banning them. Ticketmaster is one of those companies who spend an awful lot of time and effort stopping anyone accessing their site using a proxy. Indeed there’s hardly any company who is as aggressive as them, probably only Instagram who spend as much blocking, detecting and banning proxies (excepting perhaps the Chinese Government).

Ticketmaster Proxy

Their rationale is simple, they want only real users buying tickets and then only a couple each. They say this is to protect customers and artists, but in reality it’s likely protecting their profits is the number one incentive. Whatever the reasons, if you want to buy a few extra tickets or use a Bot to purchase them for you – there’s only a small amount of proxies that will actually work, here’s what to look for.

The Very Basics of Choosing a Ticketmaster Proxy

It certainly can get confusing but in reality it’s not that hard to learn how to buy proxies that work with Ticketmaster.  In fact for any task, it’s a matter of identifying your requirements, signing up for some sort of test or trial then see what works.  Don’t worry about taking your time, once you find high quality proxies that work for you then you should stick with them.

Free and Open proxies

First of all forget about using free proxies – they simply won’t work. They are all listed in the Ticketmaster blacklist database and will be flagged (as will your accounts) the second you connect to the server. It’s easy for anyone to scrape the new proxies appearing too so you can be assured a company like Ticketmaster will get them instantly.

Shared Proxy and VPN Services

Mostly you’re wasting your time with these, although it does heavily depend on who and how many people you are sharing with them. Unfortunately it’s normally a large number of people who you have no idea of what they’re doing. If any of them are involved in buying tickets or worse using a Ticketmaster Bot then you’ve had it. Ticketmaster will probably already have these addresses logged and will be waiting to add you accounts to it’s blacklist too.

The problem is that irrespective of how careful you are, someone somewhere will get the IP addresses of these proxies banned.

Static Dedicated Residential Proxies

Here we have more possibilities of success but there are still huge risks. If you are allocated a proxy with say twenty virgin IP addresses from a residential IP range (never used before with Ticketmaster) then you should be fine initially. The problem is how often you can use them especially if they’re not rotated regularly. Also dedicated residential proxies tend to come at a premium price so can be very expensive for what they are.

It really depends on scale whether this option is viable. If you refine your process, don’t overuse the proxies and can generate reliable income using your method then it could be a good option. Remember this applies to proxies with residential addresses not datacentre ones (see later point).

Rotating Private Residential Proxies

Phew a long name for a very specific requirement, but probably the best option for those serious in bossing Ticketmaster. If you’ve made some investment in a Ticketmaster Bot (which is another wise move), then you should be looking at proxies like this. Let’s just quickly break down the requirements of these sort of this ideal Ticketmaster Proxy –

Rotating – unless you have a huge pool of dedicated addresses then you need the IP addresses to rotate each time you make a transaction. How often they rotate can also be an issue, rotating in the middle of a purchase is never a good idea. Yet switching to a free unblocked address each time you try for another ticket is definitely the ideal.

Private – the IP addresses cannot be shared with anyone else as mentioned above. However most of the best proxy companies share from a large pool of residential IP addresses. Although you don’t have exclusive access, the key is not too have two people using the same address concurrently. So it’s ok to share but not at the exact same time. On the largest networks like Luminati then that’s not an issue as they have 40 million residential IP addresses. Although other companies segregate their addresses into different categories which are guaranteed to work with your chosen platform i.e. Ticketmaster.

Residential addresses – slowly the consensus is that residential addresses are pretty much essential for a Ticketmaster proxy. Most other addresses are registered in datacentres and are flagged as commercial origin. The problem is that this flag raises the likelihood that the IP address belongs to a proxy instantly. Which is exactly how Ticketmaster (and any similar sites) will view any connection originating directly from a datacentre registered address.

It does all seem kind of confusing and it’s not helped by people using different terms like elite, private or rotating in a variety of ways. Essentially though the people who succeed are the ones who’s proxies make each connection look like a completely new home user. Anything which adds to this is a plus e.g residential address and anything which detracts is obviously a negative. Normally the better proxies will cost slightly more because the companies carefully curate the addresses and don’t overuse them.

Anything too cheap in the proxy market is normally because they’re blacklisted, spammed out IP addresses which rarely work.

So here’s a small set of recommendations for those who want a decent Ticketmaster proxy that can actually work.

Rotating Proxies – a great little proxy firm which offers rotating residential proxies with unmetered access which work with Ticketmaster. Try out the trial first, make sure you tell them you want to use them with Ticketmaster and you can test them for 48 hours for a small fee.

Luminati – the biggest, best (but unfortunately also the most expensive). If you want something guaranteed to work then this is the network you need – over 40 million genuine residential IP addresses from anywhere in the world. You can configure pretty much every aspect of these in the Proxy Manager Dashboard and even switch between IP types to save money. They also have mobile IP addresses too – IP ranges which are assigned to mobile phone networks – these are great for imitating ordinary users too.

Ticketmaster Bot – there are a lot of these out there, but here’s our recommendation – one of the oldest and most reliable suppliers for all sorts of Ticket Bots, again not the cheapest but they work.